Volunteer Orientation Tours

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Tours and Orientations

Orientation and tours are a very important part of Free Geek's day-to-day operations. They impart important safety information, both in a general sense and specific for each station. For this reason it is very important that the tours given are consistent.

Starting

Roundup the Newbies

When dealing with less than 10 people its generally best to round folks up in the kitchen. If a larger group arrives try to find a central location like receiving or outside in the loading bay if its nice out. While folks are waiting give them the Volunteer Database Intake Form to fill out, and the adoption package handout.

Introductions

Begin the tour by introducing yourself, then begin a round of introductions encouraging folks to tell you why they are here so that you know what to focus on.

Background Education

When explaining the background information of how and why Free geek came to be KEEP IT SIMPLE! If folks are interested in in-depth information let them know they can find it on our website or inside the educational handouts we give out.

How was Free Geek born?

Free Geek was founded in Portland in February of 2000 to recycle computer technology and provide low and no-cost computing to individuals and not-for-profit and social change organizations in the community and throughout the world.

Version 1.0 of Free Geek created a non-profit franchise model that has since been adopted by communities all over North America, there are 9 Free Geeks in the U.S. and one here (us) in Vancouver.

Why was Free Geek born?

Free Geek was founded for two reasons: Environmental and People concerns.

Environmental Concerns

People Concerns

Generally, when I [Adam] give tours, I follow the path the hardware takes. I start in the warehouse by giving a review of what hardware is acceptable and not acceptable. I explain where our outbound recycles are going (Provincial program, or shipped to our own vetted recyclers) and use this opportunity to mention BAN and the importance of not contributing to the e-waste nightmare. Then I continue with monitor testing and a talk about the volumes of donations we receive, and why we can't keep every good working monitor [Adam: I start with monitor testing because it is a one-stop place. They can see everything from the beginning to the end all in one place]. Then we talk about how most of the good hardware is given out to other non-profit and community groups in the form of hardware grants, as well as mentioning the adoption program.

Evaluation

At this stage I'll wander towards Eval 1, and begin talking about the various evaluations that happen on the systems as they proceed through volunteer hands. I explain that eval 1 is a triage station, setup so that volunteers with no computer knowledge can, with a little training, easily filter out any potential cream for further evaluation. Eval 2 is next, here I explain that this is where we really do the wheat/chaff separation. We get the machines booted, and write down on the computer what kind of- and speed of processor we are dealing with.

Dismantling

Anything that has failed the evaluation stations (after it has been verified by a staff member) goes to dismantling. This is one of the things that sets Free Geek apart from many other recyclers, in that we strip the computers down into all of their component parts, making sure each part is recycled correctly. The purpose of this station is to separate the motherboard and other potentially valuable materials from the case and plastic and other not-so-valuable recyclables. The motherboards are then cleaned of any additions (CPU's and heat sinks, RAM/Cache chips, CMOS and other batteries), each being collected with like in the appropriate sized container.

Kitchen and Bathroom

I use this time to point out the kitchen and bathroom locations, because we are in the same general area now and pointing them out is an easy thing. All eating is to be done in the kitchen and it can be used as a 'chill out' or rest room as well, if the operations are overwhelming.

The Mezzanine

Next on the tour is the 'Mezz. This is where all the parts that have been pulled out by evaluation and dismantle are tested and if necessary built back into new computers. Parts that come up here are further sorted and then tested at various stations (Video card, hard drive, ram). Can also talk about Printer and other "floating" testing now as well. Then we talk about building, and putting these various bits back together. I'll restate that most of the building is being done for hardware grants and to feed the adoption program, and mention that we do have a thrift store that sells hardware as well.

The Store

Then I take the tour downstairs, and finish it in the store and server room.