Qcpdxstyle

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The following is poached from FG Portland. It ain't how we roll here. But let's play with this and see what we come up with. If you want to see where the broken links are supposed to go, look on Portland's wiki


QC Checklist

Welcome to the Build Workshop! Quality checking a few systems that others have built will be your first step, then you'll be ready to move on to assembling and checking software on systems.

Work through every step as well as you can, and then ask your build instructor or a neighbor if you still have questions. Try and learn the reason for each of the steps: this knowledge will come in handy later when, inevitably, things aren't going as smoothly.

Steps Notes/Detailed Instructions Done
BEFORE YOU POWER ON
Find Build/QC sheet for your system In file cabinet, filed by last digit of gizmo number
Does box rattle when you shake it? If so, find the culprit and fix/remove it.
Screws in tight? If not, tighten.
Are all slots and bays covered? If not, cover 'em.
Do you see 2 video, sound, or network ports? Check with the build instructor; one of the two is extra and needs to be removed or disabled and covered.
Is there Microsoft Branding (Certificates of Authenticity)? If there is take them off.
Are there Asset tags? (identifying the last owner) If there are, remove them.
Is the system exterior clean? If not, use cleaner and rag to clean.
Is the system standard? Check the Spec Sheet. If non-standard, please check with your instructor to see how to proceed.
BOOT AND ENTER BIOS
Get into BIOS If you see "Ubuntu" on your screen, you have gone too far; reboot and try again.
Check boot order It should be: 1st- floppy; 2nd- CD-ROM; 3rd- Hard drive. Get as close as possible, depending on the BIOS.
Is parallel port enabled on 0x378, and set to EPP or Bi-Directional EPP and Bi-Directional are the protocols spoken by standard PC computers, as opposed to Macs and some obscure devices. The "0x378" is the standard I/O space for PC parallel ports.
Save and exit.
SOFTWARE TESTING
Boot to GNU/Linux, login with username: oem password: freegeek
Update the software

If present, select the "Install all Updates" option from the update-notifier icon at the top-right of the screen. This may take some time (to download and install packages), so feel free to continue on with other steps while this runs in the background.

"basiccheck" To start terminal program:
  1. Click on black monitor icon at top of screen.
  2. Type "basiccheck" (remember tab-completion) to run the program.
  3. Read through each of the tests and verify that they pass
Test USB Details:
  • plug in a USB mouse
  • see that the cursor moves and can interact with things
  • Repeat with all usb ports
Check time and date Check the time and date in the top right corner. If incorrect:
  1. Make sure network cable is plugged in
  2. Right-click on the time and choose "Adjust date and time"
  3. Click on "Synchronize now" button.
Format a floppy disk (If there is a floppy drive.) From terminal, type "gfloppy" after putting blank floppy disk into drive. Using the default format "DOS" and using format method "Standard", format the disk. Remove the diskette from the system.
Play an audio CD Repeat for each CD-ROM drive. Do you hear what you expect?
Read data CD Repeat for each CD-ROM drive. If your file browser sees files on the drive, the CD-ROM can read files.
Remove all CDs and floppies from the drive(s)
Stress test the system for a few minutes. Open a terminal and run "stress-test". Wait a few minutes while it runs, and look for error messages. If you want to know more about what it's doing, open up another terminal and run "man stress".
Reboot using software controls Either open a terminal and run "sudo reboot", or use the graphical interface to reboot. Wait while it reboots, and ensure that the system powers on and offers a login screen without user intervention (e.g. without requiring that you "press F1 to boot").
Fill out paperwork To check and fill out paperwork:
  1. Make sure your name, etc. are filled out on the QC portion of the system's paperwork
  2. Fill in any notes you need to: did you notice anything strange?
  3. On the Build portion, make sure that component notes are adequate
Run parallel port testing program, "printme", from terminal To check the parallel port:
  1. Log in
  2. Plug the build printer into your computer
  3. From a terminal, type "printme"

A sheet with some info should print out. If there are problems, check with your instructor.

Check in with Build Instructor
Shut down system and place pieces on proper shelf Use software controls for the shutdown (either "sudo halt" or the System menu at the top). Ask where to put the system.
Clean up work area

Build Checklist

Work through every step as well as you can, and then ask your build instructor or a neighbor if you still have questions. Try and learn the reason for each of the steps: this knowledge will come in handy later when, inevitably, things aren't going as smoothly.

To find out who your build instructor is, check the whiteboard at the front of the room. Your instructor will be able to answer questions and check your work. Never overlook, though, the help that the builder to your right or left might be able to lend.

Your build instructor will check the shelves to figure out what type of boxen we need built. Check with him/her to find out what type of box to build, then work your way down this checklist.

Supplies like cards, rails, hard drives, etc., can be found in the NE corner of the build workshop. Processors, DDR and Rambus ram, and other specialty supplies you will need to ask your build instructor about.

Steps Notes/Detailed Instructions Done
Get a blank Build/QC sheet for your system They're on the wall by the screwdrivers.
Check capacitors Visually inspect motherboard capacitors for bulges/leaks. If you find one, check with your instructor.
Test battery Set voltmeter to DCV=20, place one wand on battery and one wand on metal part of case. Battery's good if volt reading >3.0.
Install RAM Note # of sticks, size, and speed on Build Sheet

ALL Celereons with SDRAM use pc-100

For PIIIs up to 1 gHz:

  • If speed ends in 50 use pc-100
  • If speed ends in 33 or 66, use pc-133
  • If speed ends in 00, try pc-100, then pc-133
  • 1 gHz and above PIII's , use pc-133

All Athlons less than 1.2 GHz, use pc-100

All Athlons 1.2 GHz and above use pc-133

For Rambus and DDR: ask a build instructor

Install video card if needed If there's onboard video, try using that.
Attach keyboard, mouse, monitor, connect power These are temporary and should be left at your station.
Initial power on See if expected memory value is displayed during POST or in BIOS.
Record Processor type and speed See if proc speed displayed during POST or in BIOS matches expected values. Record info onto Build Sheet.
  • If it is an athlon or athlon xp use the athlon number enstead of MHz. For example, for an athlon xp 3000+ running at 2200MHz, you would record 3000+.
Power down
Install floppy drive if needed Remember to plug in floppy ribbon cable and power. Record notes on build sheet.
Install network card (NIC) Only if there's no onboard NIC. If you've installed a card, record type on build sheet.
Install hard drive on IDE 1 To do this:
  • Get the appropriately sized hard drive from the supply shelf.
  • Set jumper to single or master (unjumpered if Western Digital brand).
  • Record hard drive size on build sheet.
  • Plug in power and IDE 1/Primary IDE ribbon cable (this will later be called 'hda' or 'sda').
  • Install in case.
Install sound card if needed If onboard sound, no need to install card. If you've installed a card, record info on the build sheet.
Install CD/CDRW/DVD Drive(s) Be sure to first remove any untested CDRW/DVD drives from your system and send them to advanced testing. Check the spec sheet to see what kind of drive(s) to installed. Jumper it/them appropriately, and plug into IDE 2/Secondary IDE ribbon cable (GNU/Linux will refer to these as either 'hdc' and 'hdd' or 'sc0' and 'sc1'). Some cases require special drives to fit their front covers; look upon such cases with spite and derision.
Cover open slots and bays Make sure you have coverings for all spaces that will not be filled with a card or drive. Look at similar cases for examples of what case pieces may look like.
Entering BIOS setup Turn on the computer. The keystroke to enter setup should be displayed at bootup.
Check date Make sure the date is correct.
  • NOTE: If the date is way off, the gutsy installer will fail.
Restore BIOS defaults You might need to search around to find the BIOS values that need checking. While you search, enjoy the pleasure of learning about BIOS configuration!
Auto detect hard drive Find where to perform this function or make sure this feature is enabled.
Set boot order Set drive A (floppy) to boot first, then CD-ROM, then hard drive.
Disable virus check if present Look around...
Make sure parallel port is set to 0x378 Set mode to EPP or Bi-Directional.
  • If you're having a hard time finding the right menu, try one with "peripherals" or "i/o" in its name.
Put "ebmulti" floppy in floppy drive and plug in network cable For operating system installation (your next step).
Save and exit BIOS
Boot to the freekbox installer with etherboot floppy Details:
  • Select top option "Etherboot" on first menu, then <ENTER>, then
  • Choose a detail level for your installer and press <ENTER>, then
  • Remove the EBmulti disk
Answer all the installer questions Simple: select "OK" or "Yes" at each question and press <ENTER>.

Normal: ask a build instructor for help filling out all the questions. Expert: expect to be on your own unless your build instructor suggested you do this :) ||

After install, reboot system To do this, press <ENTER> when prompted.
Run basiccheck Detailed instructions:
  • Log in as "oem" (password: freegeek).
  • Open a terminal (click on the little black screen icon at the top of the screen).
  • Type "basiccheck" (remember tab completion!) and hit <ENTER>.
  • During basic check, record needed info about onboard devices (sound, NIC, video, etc.) on build sheet.
  • Ask your peers and the teacher what parts of basiccheck mean so that you understand what it is checking.
Test CD (and/or DVD) drive - data and sound. For each drive:
  • Use a music disc to test sound.
  • Test-read a data CD (if any data shows up in the file browser that opens, test passes).
Test USB Details:
  • plug in a USB mouse
  • see that the cursor moves and can interact with things
  • repeat on all usb ports
Run parallel port testing program, "printme", from terminal To check the parallel port:
  1. Log in
  2. Plug the printer in the center of the room to your computer
  3. From a terminal, type "printme"

A sheet with some info should print out. If there are problems, check with your instructor.

Check in with Build Instructor
Shut down system and place pieces on proper shelf
Clean up work area