FUR

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Frequently Used Resources

Broadcom 43xx wifi cards:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WifiDocs/Driver/bcm43xx


Lost/forgotten password

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword


Installing skype (12.04)

http://www.skype.com/en/download-skype/skype-for-computer/ (will autodetect you're using Linux)

Download the .deb package, open it and Software Centre should automatically open and attempt to install it.


Keyboard Testing (in browser)

http://random.xem.us/rollover.html (a little buggy with Menu key)

Another better way is to not use the browser, but instead use the showkey command in the text screen (push CTRL+ALT+F1 to access; push CTRL+ALT+F7 to return to the GUI).


Missing packages "" error

In terminal, enter:

sudo /usr/share/debconf/fix_db.pl

After, running the following can help, but isn't necessary:

sudo apt-get install -f && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade


Fixing a full or nearly full /boot

When the /boot partition becomes very full package upgrades or uninstalls may fail due to a lack of working space on /boot. A full /boot is generally due to old kernels remaining installed, removing them is the best solution but may fail due to a lack of space on /boot. To fix this we can temporarily use space on the root partition to work with and then copy those changes back to the /boot partition.

# Make a copy of /boot on the root partition
sudo mkdir /mnt/boot
sudo rsync -a /boot/ /mnt/boot

# Unmount the existing boot partition and 
# replace it with our copy
sudo umount /boot
sudo mount --bind /mnt/boot /boot

# Perform your maintenance here
# Example: remove all kernels which aren't
#          the currently running one
dpkg -l 'linux-*' | \
  sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d' | \
  xargs sudo apt-get -y purge

# Remount the /boot partition and synchronize it
# with the copy
sudo umount /boot
sudo mount /boot # Mounts the default /boot device
sudo rsync -a --delete /mnt/boot/ /boot

# Clean up
sudo rm -r /mnt/boot

This code doesn't work so well, unfortunately